Mentioned on Air

John Kiriakou in Houston for a KPFT benefit August 12th

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Please join listeners and supporters of The Monitor radio show and KPFT 90.1 FM for a lively discussion and booksigning with John Kiriakou

omenojqDoors open at 6:30
Tickets $20 General Admission / $10 Students
No one will be turned away for lack of funds Tickets available online
Books and refreshments will be available for purchase.

Please note that if you made a pledge for this book in KPFT’s recent membership drive, we will have it for you at the event.  Those not picked up will be shipped from our office the following week.

John Kiriakou became an anti-torture whistleblower and activist when he told ABC News in December 2007 that the CIA was torturing prisoners, that torture was official U.S. government policy, and that the policy was approved by the President.  John was driven to ruin by the Justice Department because of these revelations.

Immediately after John’s interview, the Justice Department initiated a years-long investigation, determined to find something–anything–to charge him with.  This was his payback for blowing the whistle on the torture program.

John eventually was charged with three counts of espionage, one count of violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act and one count of making a false statement as a result of the 2007 ABC News interview.  Finally, in order to avoid the risk of spending 45 years in prison, John accepted a plea to violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act.  All other charges were dropped.  Even though he had no criminal intent, and there was no harm to the national security, accepting the plea resulted in a sentence of 30 months in prison.

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From 1990 until March 2004, first as an analyst, and later as a counterterrorism operations officer,  John Kiriakou served in the Central Intelligence Agency. He became chief of counterterrorist operations in Pakistan following the September 11 attacks acting as a senior operations officer. His tour culminated in the March 2002 with the capture of Abu Zubaydah, al-Qa’ida’s third-ranking official.

When he returned from Pakistan, John was named Executive Assistant to the CIA’s Deputy Director for Operations. In that capacity, John was the principal Iraq briefer for the Director of Central Intelligence.

John then became senior investigator on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee after a brief time in the private sector, where he focused on international terrorism, piracy, and counternarcotics.  Additionally, John served as senior intelligence advisor to the Committee’s chairman, Senator John Kerry.

Following his service on the Hill, John became an intelligence and counterterrorism consultant and author.

John Kiriakou was our guest on The Monitor last April when he discussed his new book Doing Time Like A Spy. His book is a memoir of his twenty-three months in prison. Using twenty life skills he learned in CIA operational training, he was able to keep himself safe and at the top of the prison social heap. Including his award-winning blog series “Letters from Loretto,” Doing Time Like a Spy is at once a searing journal of daily prison life and an alternately funny and heartbreaking commentary on the federal prison system.

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John Kiriakou coming to Houston!

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Ex-CIA officer turned whistleblower John Kiriakou will be in Houston to share his story in person. Plan on attending if you’re able to make it – you will not be disappointed!

When: Saturday August 12th, 7:00 pm.

Where: Dominican Sisters of Houston, 6501 Almeda Road, Houston, 77021

omenojq John Kiriakou became an anti-torture whistleblower and activist when he told ABC News in December 2007 that the CIA was torturing prisoners, that torture was official U.S. government policy, and that the policy was approved by the President.  John was driven to ruin by the Justice Department because of these revelations.

Immediately after John’s interview, the Justice Department initiated a years-long investigation, determined to find something–anything–to charge him with.  This was his payback for blowing the whistle on the torture program.

John eventually was charged with three counts of espionage, one count of violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act and one count of making a false statement as a result of the 2007 ABC News interview.  Finally, in order to avoid the risk of spending 45 years in prison, John accepted a plea to violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act.  All other charges were dropped.  Even though he had no criminal intent, and there was no harm to the national security, accepting the plea resulted in a sentence of 30 months in prison.

DTLAS+Final+PR+Cover+RGB

From 1990 until March 2004, first as an analyst, and later as a counterterrorism operations officer,  John Kiriakou served in the Central Intelligence Agency. He became chief of counterterrorist operations in Pakistan following the September 11 attacks acting as a senior operations officer. His tour culminated in the March 2002 with the capture of Abu Zubaydah, al-Qa’ida’s third-ranking official.

When he returned from Pakistan, John was named Executive Assistant to the CIA’s Deputy Director for Operations. In that capacity, John was the principal Iraq briefer for the Director of Central Intelligence.

John then became senior investigator on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee after a brief time in the private sector, where he focused on international terrorism, piracy, and counternarcotics.  Additionally, John served as senior intelligence advisor to the Committee’s chairman, Senator John Kerry.

Following his service on the Hill, John became an intelligence and counterterrorism consultant and author.

John Kiriakou was our guest on The Monitor last April when he discussed his new book Doing Time Like A Spy. His book is a memoir of his twenty-three months in prison. Using twenty life skills he learned in CIA operational training, he was able to keep himself safe and at the top of the prison social heap. Including his award-winning blog series “Letters from Loretto,” Doing Time Like a Spy is at once a searing journal of daily prison life and an alternately funny and heartbreaking commentary on the federal prison system.

Show Details for the week of July 3rd, 2017

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On The Monitor this week:

  • Howard Zinn‘s 2009 speech at The Progressive Magazine‘s 100th anniversary
  • Part of a talk by Noam Chomsky from 1990 describing propaganda terms in the media and what they mean

zinnportraitHoward Zinn was an American historian, political scientist, social critic, activist and playwright. He is best known as author of the best-seller ‘A People’s History of the United States’. Zinn has been active in the Civil Rights and the anti-war movements in the United States. Howard Zinn passed away on January 27, 2010. Zinn was raised in a working-class family in Brooklyn, and flew bombing missions for the United States in World War II, an experience he now points to in shaping his opposition to war. In 1956, he became a professor at Spelman College in Atlanta, a school for black women, where he soon became involved in the Civil rights movement, which he participated in as an adviser to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee SNCC and chronicled, in his book SNCC The New Abolitionists. Zinn collaborated with historian Staughton Lynd and mentored a young student named Alice Walker. When he was fired in 1963 for insubordination related to his protest work, he moved to Boston University, where he became a leading critic of the Vietnam War.

noam-chomsky1Noam Chomsky is an American linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist, historian, social critic, and political activist. Sometimes described as “the father of modern linguistics”, Chomsky is also a major figure in analytic philosophy and one of the founders of the field of cognitive science. He is Institute Professor Emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he has worked since 1955, and is the author of over 100 books on topics such as linguistics, war, politics, and mass media. Ideologically, he aligns with anarcho-syndicalism and libertarian socialism.

Born to middle-class Ashkenazi Jewish immigrants in Philadelphia, Chomsky developed an early interest in anarchism from alternative bookstores in New York City. At the age of 16 he began studies at the University of Pennsylvania, taking courses in linguistics, mathematics, and philosophy. From 1951 to 1955 he was appointed to Harvard University’s Society of Fellows, where he developed the theory of transformational grammar for which he was awarded his doctorate in 1955. That year he began teaching at MIT, in 1957 emerging as a significant figure in the field of linguistics for his landmark work Syntactic Structures, which remodeled the scientific study of language, while from 1958 to 1959 he was a National Science Foundation fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study. He is credited as the creator or co-creator of the universal grammar theory, the generative grammar theory, the Chomsky hierarchy, and the minimalist program. Chomsky also played a pivotal role in the decline of behaviorism, being particularly critical of the work of B. F. Skinner.

An outspoken opponent of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, which he saw as an act of American imperialism, in 1967 Chomsky attracted widespread public attention for his anti-war essay “The Responsibility of Intellectuals”. Associated with the New Left, he was arrested multiple times for his activism and placed on President Richard Nixon’s Enemies List. While expanding his work in linguistics over subsequent decades, he also became involved in the Linguistics Wars. In collaboration with Edward S. Herman, Chomsky later co-wrote an analysis articulating the propaganda model of media criticism, and worked to expose the Indonesian occupation of East Timor. However, his defense of unconditional freedom of speech – including for Holocaust deniers – generated significant controversy in the Faurisson affair of the early 1980s. Following his retirement from active teaching, he has continued his vocal political activism, including opposing the War on Terror and supporting the Occupy movement.

One of the most cited scholars in history, Chomsky has influenced a broad array of academic fields. He is widely recognized as a paradigm shifter who helped spark a major revolution in the human sciences, contributing to the development of a new cognitivistic framework for the study of language and the mind. In addition to his continued scholarly research, he remains a leading critic of U.S. foreign policy, neoliberalism and contemporary state capitalism, the Israeli–Palestinian conflict, and mainstream news media. His ideas have proved highly significant within the anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist movements, but have also drawn criticism, with some accusing Chomsky of anti-Americanism.

In 2006 The Progressive Magazine published a text by Howard Zinn that is well worth a read today.

Show Details for the week of May 22nd, 2017

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On The Monitor this week:

More about this week’s guests:

quote-media-manipulation-in-the-u-s-today-is-more-efficient-than-it-was-in-nazi-germany-because-mark-crispin-miller-67-14-66Mark Crispin Miller is a Professor of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University. He is the author of several books, including Boxed In: The Culture of TV; The Bush Dyslexicon: Observations on a National Disorder; Cruel and Unusual: Bush/Cheney’s New World Order and Fooled Again: The Real Case for Electoral Reform. He is also the editor of Loser Take All: Election Fraud and the Subversion of Democracy, 2000-2008. His essays and articles have appeared in many journals, magazines and newspapers throughout the nation and the world, and he has given countless interviews worldwide. Miller is the editor of Icons of America, a book series published by Yale University Press. Miller is now at work on The Marlboro Man: An American Success Story, to be published by Yale University Press in 2011. He is also editor of Discovering America, a new book series from the University of Texas Press. In 2004, Miller wrote Patriot Act, a show that he performed for six weeks at the New York Theater Workshop, co-starring with Steve Cuiffo. Miller earned his bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University in 1971, and his doctorate in English from Johns Hopkins University in 1977. Although he specialized in Renaissance literature, Miller is best known as a media critic. Before joining New York University, Miller served as director of film studies at Johns Hopkins University.

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Shireen Al-Adeimi is a doctoral student in Human Development and Education. She has taught sixth grade Language Arts and Literature in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and is currently studying the role of classroom discussion in developing students’ writing quality. In particular, she is interested in academic language and hopes to make salient the linguistic features that are indicative of academic language production in writing. She is also conducting research that investigates the role of bilingualism in the manifestation of cognitive processes in writing. Al-Ademi holds an M.A. in education from the University of Michigan.

Show Details for the week of October 3rd, 2016

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KPFT is in Pledge Drive and this is your first chance to support The Monitor. The show has a goal of $880 for the hour. Please call 713.526.5738 during the show to pledge your support. You can also donate securely online at https://pledge.kpft.org/ Just select The Monitor from the list of shows and enter your details. Thank you!

This week we feature an interview with Steve Miller during which we will discuss Michael Larsen‘s book Guardianship: How Judges and Lawyers Steal Your Money

More about this week’s guest:

steveatgrandjurySteve Miller, is a former Las Vegas City Councilman, former Clark County Regional Transportation Commissioner, Chairman Emeritus of Goodwill Industries of Southern Nevada, and President Emeritus of Opportunity Village, a charity. He has been writing about guardianship fraud for over ten years. One of his stories prompted a television ad in a highly charged political race in Nevada. The story is about a “guardian” Jared E. Shafer who is being sued for “embezzling” $420,000.00 from a 95 year old former “ward” by his daughter. Guadalupe Olvera was a WWII veteran; fortunately his daughter was warned to get her father out of Nevada by any means in the dead of night. Shafer came after her and the person who helped her in a legal fight to avoid relinquishing control by claiming the daughter “kidnapped” her father. Olvera’s daughter wrote to Catherine Cortez Masto in December 2011, asking for help terminating the guardianship relationship. When the family pleaded directly with then Attorney General Cortez Masto for help, according to the daughter, Cortez Masto turned them away.

Quote: “…usually after the victims are purportedly diagnosed with a disease such as Alzheimer’s (often by a non-expert without medical evidence), then, in spite of protests by family members, the family court has historically and consistently approved the bilking of the hard earned assets of elderly or disabled persons by crooked for-hire guardians under the color of often-ignored Nevada laws.”

The Green Party Convention: Houston, 2016

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The Green Party held its convention in Houston August 4-7, 2016 and the Pacifica Network was there to cover the event, including 4 hours of live coverage carried by all 5 network stations (KPFA, KPFK, KPFT, WBAI, WBFW) and many affiliates. I hosted those hours with several people (more on that below). This post is less about the coverage and more a place to share some observations and a few pictures. You are welcome to comment and share but if you share the pictures please credit me and link back to this post.

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Impressions as a member of the “Press”:

_DSF0879To give you some context for what follows, my only reference point for comparison is the 2012 Democratic Party Convention. Until I arrived on the UH campus, the 2012 DNC was the only US political convention I had attended in person. It will surprise no one that the Greens’ convention was much smaller: Fewer people, smaller venue, much less media attention, etc. These are not necessarily negative observations however because they made for a more friendly and unpretentious atmosphere. While the ’12 DNC was slick, loud, and highly orchestrated, the ’16 Green Convention was low key and relatively amateur. Here are the things that stood out to me as a member of the media covering both events: At the DNC the entire venue was blocked off and access was very controlled. I had to go through multiple security checkpoints, including metal detectors and sniffer dogs, just to get in the venue. Inside the venue the various areas were only accessible with the correct credentials and access was restricted in various ways, even if you had the credentials to be there. For example, I had media credentials to the convention floor but I could only walk in and out at specific times and at one point was not allowed in at all. The credentials themselves were textured plastic and incorporated several security features to deter counterfeiting (like textured surfaces and bar codes). _DSF0916

In very stark contrast, the Green convention was in the student center at UH. The building was open to anyone and I saw no restrictions to access any of the rooms (with the exception of the one room reserved for press conferences). The credentials consisted of a clear plastic name-tag holder with glued-on ribbon reading “Press” and a shoelace lanyard. Despite registering ahead of time, when I arrived to check in the volunteer wrote my details on a bit of card and put the card in the holder. It was something one of my kids could have done.

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Attendees were, as far as I could tell, mostly older (over 30) and predominantly white. There was a subset that was a diverse mix of ages and backgrounds and many of these appeared to be migrating Bernie Sanders supporters. I spoke to a few of them, including YahNe Ndgo, and they seemed disappointed enough with the Dems to be now pinning their hope on the Greens. A decent summary of this phenomenon is offered by Christopher Hooks on Politico’s website: What If the Green Party Stopped Being Kooky and Started Getting Real? (note: I don’t know Hooks and have no affiliation with Politico or the Texas Observer).

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_DSF0901Speeches were well attended and the crowd was enthusiastic. The best speech was Cornel West’s keynote (that is not him in the picture, obviously). As our 4 hours of live radio thundered along, we were plagued with all sorts of issues that made getting the broadcast on the air on ongoing challenge. Otis Maclay (pictured below) and Bobby Modad performed several technical contortions in a constant struggle against fluctuating audio quality from the convention floor, distracting background noise in the room, and impromptu visits and comments from passers by. _DSF0910

Despite the many challenges and variable sound quality, I am happy to have witnessed and covered this convention. If you want to hear what it all sounded like you can check out the archive on audioport where you will hear the many voices besides mine, including David Cobb, Ann Garrison, Greg Palast, Kat Gruene, Staci Davis, Scooter, YahNe Ndgo, Cornell West, Howie Hawkins, Bruce Dixon, Ajamu Baraka, and Jill Stein.

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Show Details for the week of February 15th, 2016

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KPFT is in the final week of its winter pledge drive so this is your last chance to support The Monitor during this drive. We beat the goal last week and would love to do the same again this week. The goal is $800 and we can do it with your support when you call 713 526 5738 during the show or pledge online at www.kpft.org

Our special thank you gift this week is Censored 2016: The Top Censored Stories and Media Analysis of 2014-15. Pick up a copy for a pledge of $90. censored2016-front-cover

Review

“Project Censored’s list of the top stories that get very little mainstream media traction should in fact drive the reporting agendas of every major news outlet. These 25 stories are clearly the most consequential of the year, and what is scary in looking at the list is how obvious it is that silencing reports of these themes protects corrupt governments and corporate gatekeepers. Project Censored is a lifeline to the world’s most urgent and significant stories.” –Naomi Wolf

roth-225x300This week we have Andy Lee Roth as our guest. Andy is associate director of Project Censored. He earned a Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles and a B.A. in Sociology and Anthropology at Haverford College.

In addition to co-editing the 2014, 2013, 2009 and 2008 editions of Censored, he has published research on communities organizing for urban parklands (in the journalCity & Community), journalists’ questioning of electoral candidates (Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics), public commentary on federal tobacco control legislation (Social Studies of Science), and social interaction in broadcast news interviews (Language in Society and Media, Culture & Society).

His current work focuses on the importance of a free press for democratic self-government and the ways that corporate news media narrow the scope of legitimate public debate.  His most recent publications include “Iceland, the Power of Peaceful Revolution, and the Commons” in Censored 2014: Fearless Speech in Fateful Times and “Framing Al-Awlaki: How Government Officials and Corporate Media Legitimized a Targeted Killing,” which appeared in Censored 2013: Dispatches from the Media Revolution.

He teaches sociology at Sonoma State University and the College of Marin.

You can listen to an interview with Project Censored’s Mickey Huff from January 4th here

dronesLast week we had Marjorie Cohn on the show to talk about her latest article “Want Endless War? Love the U.S. Empire? Well, Hillary Clinton’s Your Choice” and a volume she edited called Drones and Targeted Killing: Legal, Moral and Geopolitical Issues which you can get during this week’s show for a pledge of $120.

Reviews:

”This book provides much-needed analysis of why America’s targeted killing program is illegal, immoral and unwise.” —from the foreword by Archbishop Desmond Tutu

“Very important book… In a few months we will commemorate the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, which, despite the limits of the day, established the founding principle of modern law: presumption of innocence. Today that principle has been rescinded. Guilty verdicts are no longer to be rendered by a jury of peers, but by a White House session deciding who we are going to kill today along with whatever unfortunates happen to be in the vicinity of the drone attack. As these valuable essays show, Obama s global terror campaign is a menace to the world, and Americans are not likely to escape unscathed.”
Noam Chomsky